A cross-sectional study of Taenia solium in a multiple taeniid-endemic region reveals competition may be protective

J.V. Conlan, K. Vongxay, B. Khamlome, P. Dorny, B. Sripa, A. Elliot, S.D. Blacksell, S. Fenwick, R.C.A. Thompson

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    Abstract

    We conducted cross-sectional surveys for taeniasis and cysticercosis in humans, pigs, and dogs in four northern provinces of Laos. Human cysticercosis and taeniasis prevalence was 2.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4-3.0%) and 8.4% (95% CI = 6.9-9.9%), respectively. Eating uncooked beef, being male, province of residence, age, and ethnicity were significant risk factors for taeniasis and only province of residence was a significant risk factor for cystiercosis. Thirty-five human tapeworms were recovered during the survey and 33 (94.3%) and 2 (5.7%) were identified as Taenia saginata and T. solium, respectively. Maximum-likelihood adjusted prevalence of T. solium and T. hydatigena in pigs was 4.2% (95% CI = 0.5-7.9%) and 55.9% (95% CI = 47.5-64.3%), respectively, and T. hydatigena taeniasis in dogs was 4.8% (95% CI = 0.0-11.3%). Taenia hydatigena and T. saginata were the most prevalent taeniids in the respective pig and human populations and together may suppress T. solium transmission.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
    Volume87
    Issue number2
    Pages (from-to)281-291
    Number of pages11
    ISSN0002-9637
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Keywords

    • Helminthic diseases
    • Zoonoses
    • Cysticercosis
    • Taeniasis
    • Taenia solium
    • Taenia saginata
    • Taenia hydatigena
    • Taenia asiatica
    • Humans
    • Pigs
    • Dogs
    • Prevalence
    • Risk factors
    • Food preparation
    • Meat
    • Gender
    • Age
    • Ethnicity
    • Mathematical modeling
    • Laos
    • Asia-Southeast

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