A scoping review of viral diseases in African ungulates

Hendrik Swanepoel, Jan Crafford, Melvyn Quan

Research output: Contribution to journalA1: Web of Science-article

Abstract

(1) Background: Viral diseases are important as they can cause significant clinical disease in both wild and domestic animals, as well as in humans. They also make up a large proportion of emerging infectious diseases. (2) Methods: A scoping review of peer-reviewed publications was performed and based on the guidelines set out in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) extension for scoping reviews. (3) Results: The final set of publications consisted of 145 publications. Thirty-two viruses were identified in the publications and 50 African ungulates were reported/diagnosed with viral infections. Eighteen countries had viruses diagnosed in wild ungulates reported in the literature. (4) Conclusions: A comprehensive review identified several areas where little information was available and recommendations were made. It is recommended that governments and research institutions offer more funding to investigate and report viral diseases of greater clinical and zoonotic significance. A further recommendation is for appropriate One Health approaches to be adopted for investigating, controlling, managing and preventing diseases. Diseases which may threaten the conservation of certain wildlife species also require focused attention. In order to keep track of these diseases, it may be necessary to consider adding a "Wildlife disease and infection" category to the World Organisation for Animal Health-listed diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Article number17
JournalVeterinary Sciences
Volume8
Issue number2
Number of pages32
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • foot and mouth disease
  • African swine fever
  • rift valley fever
  • bluetongue
  • lumpy skin disease
  • peste des petits ruminants
  • small ruminant morbillivirus
  • African horse sickness
  • INFECTIOUS-DISEASES
  • GLOBAL TRENDS
  • SWINE-FEVER
  • VIRUS
  • RABIES
  • WILDLIFE
  • KUDU
  • TRANSMISSION
  • ANTIBODIES
  • FIELD

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