Effects of sexual network connectivity and antimicrobial drug use on antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

Chris R. Kenyon, Ilan S. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalA1: Web of Science-article

Abstract

Contemporary strategies to curtail the emergence of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae include screening for and treating asymptomatic infections in high-prevalence populations in whom antimicrobial drug-resistant infections have typically emerged. We argue that antimicrobial resistance in these groups is driven by a combination of dense sexual network connectivity and antimicrobial drug exposure (for example, through screen-and-treat strategies for asymptomatic N. gonorrhoeae infection). Sexual network connectivity sustains a high-equilibrium prevalence of N. gonorrhoeae and increases likelihood of reinfection, whereas antimicrobial drug exposure results in selection pressure for reinfecting N. gonorrhoeae strains to acquire antimicrobial resistance genes from commensal pharyngeal or rectal flora. We propose study designs to test this hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume24
Issue number7
Pages (from-to)1195-1203
Number of pages9
ISSN1080-6040
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS
  • UNITED-STATES
  • RISK-FACTORS
  • PREEXPOSURE PROPHYLAXIS
  • MEN
  • AZITHROMYCIN
  • PREVALENCE
  • PREVENTION
  • SUSCEPTIBILITY
  • EPIDEMIOLOGY

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