Electronic medical records and same day patient tracing improves clinic efficiency and adherence to appointments in a community based HIV/AIDS care program, in Uganda

ST Alamo, GJ Wagner, P Sunday, RK Wanyenze, J Ouma, M Kamya, R Colebunders, F Wabwire-Mangen

    Research output: Contribution to journalA1: Web of Science-article

    Abstract

    Patients who miss clinic appointments make unscheduled visits which compromise the ability to plan for and deliver quality care. We implemented Electronic Medical Records (EMR) and same day patient tracing to minimize missed appointments in a community-based HIV clinic in Kampala. Missed, early, on-schedule appointments and waiting times were evaluated before (pre-EMR) and 6 months after implementation of EMR and patient tracing (post-EMR). Reasons for missed appointments were documented pre and post-EMR. The mean daily number of missed appointments significantly reduced from 21 pre-EMR to 8 post-EMR. The main reason for missed appointments was forgetting (37%) but reduced significantly by 30% post-EMR. Loss to follow-up (LTFU) also significantly decreased from 10.9 to 4.8% The total median waiting time to see providers significantly decreased from 291 to 94 min. Our findings suggest that EMR and same day patient tracing can significantly reduce missed appointments, and LTFU and improve clinic efficiency.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalAIDS and Behavior
    Volume16
    Issue number2
    Pages (from-to)368-374
    ISSN1090-7165
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Keywords

    • B780-tropical-medicine
    • Viral diseases
    • HIV
    • AIDS
    • Control programs
    • Community-based care
    • Efficiency
    • Compliance
    • Loss to follow-up
    • Patient records
    • Medical records
    • Data processing
    • Databases
    • Hospitals
    • Management
    • Evaluation
    • Uganda
    • Africa-East

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