Gender obesity inequities are huge but differ greatly according to environment and socio-economics in a north African setting: a national cross-sectional study in Tunisia

J. El Ati, P. Traissac, F. Delpeuch, H. Aounallah-Skhiri, C. Beji, S. Eymard-Duvernay, S. Bougatef, P. Kolsteren, B. Maire, H. Ben Romdhane

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    Abstract

    INTRODUCTION: Southern Mediterranean countries have experienced a marked increase in the prevalence of obesity whose consequences for gender related health inequities have been little studied. We assessed gender obesity inequalities and their environmental and socio-economic modifiers among Tunisian adults. METHODS: Cross-sectional survey in 2005; national, 3 level random cluster sample of 35-70 years Tunisians (women: n = 2964, men: n = 2379). Overall adiposity was assessed by BMI = weight(kg)/height(m)(2) and obesity was BMI>/=30, WHtR = waist circumference to height ratio defined abdominal obesity as WHtR>/=0.6. Gender obesity inequality measure was women versus men Prevalence Proportion Odds-Ratio (OR); models featuring gender x covariate interaction assessed variation of gender obesity inequalities with area (urban versus rural), age, marital status or socio-economic position (profession, education, household income proxy). RESULTS: BMI was much higher among women (28.4(0.2)) versus men (25.3(0.1)), P
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalPLoS ONE
    Volume7
    Issue number10
    Pages (from-to)e48153
    ISSN1932-6203
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Keywords

    • Nutrition status
    • Obesity
    • Overweight
    • Body mass index
    • BMI
    • Prevalence
    • Gender distribution
    • Men
    • Women
    • Inequalities
    • Abdominal circumference
    • Waist circumference
    • Environmental factors
    • Socioeconomic factors
    • Urban
    • Rural
    • Educational level
    • Employees
    • Tunisia
    • Africa-North

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