HIV seroprevalence among hospital workers in Kinshasa, Zaire; lack of association with occupational exposure

JM Mann, H Francis, TC Quinn, K Bila, KA Pangu, B Ngaly, N Nzilambi, L Jansegers, P Piot, K Ruti

Research output: Contribution to journalA2: International peer reviewed article (not A1-type)

Abstract

A study of seroprevalence of the human immunodeficiency virus involving 2384 (96%) of Mama Yemo Hospital's (Kinshasa, Zaire) 2492 personnel found 152 (6.4%) to be seropositive. Prevalence was higher among women than among men (8.1% vs 5.2%); in women peak seroprevalence (13.9%) occurred in 20- to 29-year-olds. Workers most likely to be seropositive were those who were relatively young, those who were unmarried, those reporting a blood transfusion or hospitalization during the previous ten years, and those receiving medical injections during the previous three years. Medical, administrative, and manual workers had similar seroprevalence (6.5%, 6.4%, and 6.0%, respectively), and seropositivity was not associated with any measure of patient, blood, or needle contact. These findings are consistent with other hospital-based studies indicating low risks for occupational transmission of human immunodeficiency virus
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume256
Pages (from-to)3099-3102
ISSN0098-7484
Publication statusPublished - 1986

Keywords

  • B780-tropical-medicine
  • Viral diseases
  • Antibodies
  • HIV
  • Seroprevalence
  • Immunology
  • Hospital workers
  • Environmental exposure
  • Occupations
  • Risk
  • Sex factors
  • Kinshasa
  • Congo-Kinshasa
  • Africa-Central

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