Implicit attitudes to sexual partner concurrency vary by sexual orientation but not by gender; a cross sectional study of Belgian students

Chris R. Kenyon, Kenny Wolfs, Kara Osbak, Jacques van Lankveld, Guido van Hal

Research output: Contribution to journalA1: Web of Science-article

Abstract

High rates of sexual partner concurrency have been shown to facilitate the spread of various sexually transmitted infections. Assessments of explicit attitudes to concurrency have however found little difference between populations. Implicit attitudes to concurrency may vary between populations and play a role in generating differences in the prevalence of concurrency. We developed a concurrency implicit associations test (C-IAT) to assess if implicit attitudes towards concurrency may vary between individuals and populations and what the correlates of these variations are. A sample of 869 Belgian students (mean age 23, SD 5.1) completed an online version of the C-IAT together with a questionnaire concerning sexual behavior and explicit attitudes to concurrency. The study participants C-IATs demonstrated a strong preference for monogamy (-0.78, SD = 0.41). 93.2% of participants had a promonogamy C-IAT. There was no difference in this implicit preference for monogamy between heterosexual men and women. Men who have sex with men and women who have sex with women were more likely to exhibit implicit but not explicit preferences for concurrency compared to heterosexual men and women. Correlates of the C-IAT varied between men and women.

Original languageEnglish
Article number0196821
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume13
Issue number5
Number of pages15
ISSN1932-6203
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • HIV-INFECTION RISK
  • SOUTH-AFRICA
  • ASSOCIATION TEST
  • UNITED-STATES
  • YOUNG-PEOPLE
  • CONDOM USE
  • PREVALENCE
  • WOMEN
  • MULTIPLE
  • BEHAVIOR

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