Mycobacterium ulcerans infection (Buruli ulcer) on the face: a comparative analysis of 13 clinically suspected cases from the Democratic Republic of Congo

MD Phanzu, RL Mahema, Patrick Suykerbuyk, DH Imposo, LF Lehman, E Nduwamahoro, WM Meyers, M Boelaert, F Portaels

    Research output: Contribution to journalA1: Web of Science-article

    Abstract

    We report our experience in managing 13 consecutive clinically suspected cases of Buruli ulcer on the face treated at the hospital of the Institut Medical Evangelique at Kimpese, Democratic Republic of Congo diagnosed during 2003-2007. During specific antibiotherapy, facial edema diminished, thus minimizing the subsequent extent of surgery and severe disfigurations. The following complications were observed: 1) lagophthalmos from scarring in four patients and associated ectropion in three of them; 2) blindness in one eye in one patient; 3) disfiguring exposure of teeth and gums resulting from excision of the left labial commissure that affected speech, drinking, and eating in one patient; and 4) dissemination of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection in three patients. Our study highlights the importance of this clinical presentation of Buruli ulcer, and the need for health workers in disease-endemic areas to be aware of the special challenges management of Buruli ulcer on the face presents.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
    Volume85
    Issue number6
    Pages (from-to)1100-1105
    ISSN0002-9637
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

    Keywords

    • B780-tropical-medicine
    • Bacterial diseases
    • Buruli ulcer
    • Mycobacterium tuberculosis
    • Case reports
    • Comparison
    • Clinical manifestations
    • Face
    • Eyes
    • Edema
    • Scarring
    • Lesions
    • Children
    • Treatment
    • Antibiotics
    • Surgery
    • Congo-Kinshasa
    • Africa-Central

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