in vitro antimicrobial sensitivity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from Rwanda

J Bogaerts, J Vandepitte, E Van Dyck, R Vanhoof, M Dekegel, P Piot

Research output: Contribution to journalA2: International peer reviewed article (not A1-type)

Abstract

The in vitro sensitivity of 104 isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to six antimicrobial agents was tested. More than 50% of the isolates produced penicillinase. Of those that did not produce penicillinase, 26% were resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)) greater than or equal to 0.5 mg/l), and 68% showed a decreased sensitivity for penicillin G (0.06 less than or equal to MIC less than or equal to 0.25 mg/l). Twenty six per cent and 50% of the strains, respectively, showed a decreased sensitivity to thiamphenicol (MIC greater than or equal to 1 mg/l) and tetracycline (MIC greater than or equal to 2 mg/l). All isolates were sensitive to spectinomycin, kanamycin, and norfloxacin. Of 20 penicillinase producing N gonorrhoeae (PPNG) isolates examined, seven contained the 3.4 megadalton R-plasmid, another seven contained both the 3.4 megadalton and 22.5 megadalton plasmids, five the 4.3 megadalton and 22.5 megadalton plasmids, and one isolate harboured both the 3.4 and 4.3 R-plasmids, together with the 22.5 megadalton plasmid. A disturbing increase in resistance to penicillin has been observed since the publication of earlier surveys, and the clinical implications of these findings are discussed
Original languageEnglish
JournalGenitourinary Medicine
Volume62
Pages (from-to)217-220
ISSN0266-4348
Publication statusPublished - 1986

Keywords

  • B780-tropical-medicine
  • Bacteriology
  • Antibiotics
  • Pharmacology
  • Neisseria gonorrhoeae
  • Enzymology
  • Drug effects
  • Actinospectacin
  • Kanamycin
  • Microbial sensitivity tests
  • Norfloxacin
  • Penicillin G
  • Resistance
  • Penicillinase
  • Biosynthesis
  • R factors
  • Tetracycline
  • Thiamphenicol
  • Rwanda
  • Africa-Central

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