Incidence and risk factors associated with lost to follow-up in a Belgian cohort of HIV-infected patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy

T Schepens, S Morreel, E Florence, O Koole, R Colebunders

    Research output: Contribution to journalA1: Web of Science-article

    Abstract

    Being lost to follow-up (LTFU) is a major problem in caring for persons with HIV infection. We describe the proportions and characteristics of LTFU in a Belgian outpatient HIV clinic. All patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) who attended at least two consultations were included. Patients not returning within the following year were considered LTFU. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression was performed. The LTFU rate was 5.5% on average and remained stable over the years. Patients LTFU were more often intravenous drug users (odds ratio [OR] = 3.48), not covered by health insurance (OR = 6.69), living outside the province (OR = 1.49) and treated with a complex initial HAART regimen (OR = 5.80). Increased age was also associated with a higher risk of LTFU. Patients at risk for LTFU after starting HAART should be the targeted for reinforced counselling and HIV treatment centres should establish systems to trace patients LTFU.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalInternational Journal of STD & AIDS
    Volume21
    Issue number11
    Pages (from-to)765-769
    Number of pages5
    ISSN0956-4624
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Keywords

    • B780-tropical-medicine
    • Viral diseases
    • HIV
    • AIDS
    • Incidence
    • HAART
    • Antiretrovirals
    • Cohort studies
    • Follow-up
    • Compliance
    • Outpatients
    • Drug users
    • Injections
    • Risk factors
    • Health insurance
    • Distance
    • Drug regimens
    • Age
    • Belgium
    • Europe-West

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