Nonviral transfection of distinct types of human dendritic cells: high-efficiency gene transfer by electrophoration into hematopoietic progenitor- but not monocyte-derived dendritic cells

VF Van Tendeloo, HW Snoeck, F Lardon, GL Vanham, G Nijs, M Lenjou, L Hendriks, C Van Broeckhoven, A Moulijn, I Rodrigus, P Verdonk, DR Van Bockstaele, ZN Berneman

Research output: Contribution to journalA1: Web of Science-article

Abstract

Human dendritic cells (DC) are highly professional antigen presenting cells for the priming of naive cytotoxic T cells. Gene transfer in DC would be a useful strategy to load DC with relevant de novo synthesized antigens for immunotherapeutical purposes. As a first step towards a DC-based gene therapy, we examined the efficiency of nonviral transfection in different types of cultured human dendritic cells with a humanized red-shifted green fluorescent protein reporter gene. Plasmid DNA transfection by electroporation or lipofection was used to transfect CD34+ progenitor cell-derived DC (PC-DC) and Langerhans' cells (PC-LC), as well as monocyte-derived DC (Mo-DC). While lipofection was unsuccessful in all types of DC, we obtained high-efficiency gene transfer by electroporation in PC-LC (16%) and PC-DC (12%). In contrast, electroporation was strikingly less efficient in Mo-DC (< or = 2%). The potent allostimulatory capacity of DC was still retained in electroporated PC-DC and PC-LC. In conclusion, electroporation of antigen expressing plasmid DNA is an efficient tool for nonviral gene transfer in PC-DC and PC-LC, but not in Mo-DC and could be useful for the development of DC-based tumor immunotherapy
Original languageEnglish
JournalGene Therapy
Volume5
Pages (from-to)700-707
Publication statusPublished - 1998

Keywords

  • B780-tropical-medicine
  • Cytology
  • Dendritic cells
  • Genetics
  • Metabolism
  • Plasmids
  • Hematopoietic stem cells
  • Langerhans cells
  • Luminescent proteins
  • Monocytes

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