Patients who return to care after tracking remain at high risk of attrition: experience from a large HIV clinic, Uganda

A. Nakiwogga-Muwanga, J. Musaazi, E. Katabira, W. Worodria, S.A. Talisuna, R. Colebunders

    Research output: Contribution to journalA1: Web of Science-article

    Abstract

    Objective: To determine the retention rate of patients infected with HIV who resumed care after being tracked at the Infectious Diseases Clinic (IDC) in Kampala, Uganda. Methods: Between April 2011 and September 2013, patients who missed their clinic appointment for 8-90 days were tracked, and those who returned to the clinic within 120 days were followed up. The proportion of patients retained among tracked patients, and those who resumed care before tracking started was compared. Results: At 18 months of follow up, 33 (39%) of the tracked patients and 72 (61%) of those who had resumed care before tracking started were retained in care. The most important cause of attrition among the traceable was self-transfer to another clinic (38 [73%] patients), whereas among those who resumed care before tracking was loss to follow up (LTFU) (32 [71%] patients). Conclusion: Tracked patients who resume care following a missed appointment are at high risk of attrition. To increase retention, ART clinics need to adopt a chronic care model which takes into consideration patients' changing needs and their preference for self-management.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalInternational Journal of STD & AIDS
    Volume26
    Issue number1
    Pages (from-to)42-47
    Number of pages6
    ISSN0956-4624
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

    Keywords

    • Viral diseases
    • HIV
    • AIDS
    • HAART
    • Antiretrovirals
    • Loss to follow-up
    • Retention
    • Compliance
    • Patient care management
    • Transfer
    • Hospital care
    • Uganda
    • Africa-East

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